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Illumina and Genomics England partner to develop new informatics tools

MDBR Staff Writer Published 12 February 2016

Illumina has partnered with Genomics England to develop a new platform and knowledge base, which can be used to improve and automate genome interpretation.

Genomics England will use the tools being developed to enable researchers and clinicians to access information and reports more readily.

The partnership will develop and deliver systems for clinical interpretation, decision support and knowledge curation for the 100,000 Genomes Project.

Under the deal, the new informatics tools will be developed, which will support the delivery of genomic clinical and research services at a population scale to the NHS Genomic Medicine Centers and the Genomics England Clinical Interpretation Partners.

Illumina will involve in the development of interpretation and reporting that will be used in delivering reports on all genomes that are sequenced through the 100,000 Genomes Project.

Genomics England will offer access to whole genome sequence and de-identified phenotypic data for the development of this suite of tools for personalised medicine.

The deal also includes the ability for Genomics England to work with Illumina's other tools, NextBio® and BaseSpace®, for data access and genomic data management.

Illumina will provide tools to Genomics England researchers and the GENE Consortium part of the 100,000 Genomes dataset as a pilot within NextBio Clinical, which will enable cohort analysis of complex phenotypic and genotypic information from de-identified genomes.

Illumina chairman and CEO Jay Flatley said: "The development of our suite of technologies and platforms is critical to enabling physicians in the future to make educated diagnoses based on a patient's genome which will lead to better health outcomes."