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Menarini-Silicon, Swift Biosciences to provide NGS technologies for tumor cell analysis

MDBR Staff Writer Published 26 October 2016

Menarini-Silicon Biosystems has partnered with Swift Biosciences to provide customized next-generation sequencing (NGS) product for oncology research and diagnostics.

Commercialized by Menarini-Silicon Biosystems, the first two products developed for tumor cells from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples will enable users to secure NGS results from 100 to 300 tumor and stromal cells by using Menarini-Silicon’s DEPArray cell sorting platform.

The DEPArray OncoSeek panel will enable simultaneous analysis of sequence variants and copy number alterations focused on cancer-associated genes.

It employs a streamlined single tube, two-hour reaction and ready-to-sequence Illumina-compatible libraries.

The DEPArray LibPrep kit will help researchers to construct high complex NGS libraries starting from a few hundred FFPE cells that contain low amounts of damaged and fragmented DNA.

It can be used in different downstream genetic applications, including either low-pass or deep whole genome sequencing and whole exome sequencing that uses hybridization capture probes for target enrichment.

Menarini-Silicon Biosystems CEO Giuseppe Giorgini said: "We are excited to continue our technology collaboration with Swift Biosciences to offer our customers reliable solutions for the genetic analysis of cells derived from FFPE tissue samples.”

Swift Biosciences president and CEO Dr Timothy Harkins said: "Our partnership with Menarini-Silicon Biosystems shows how complementary technologies and know how can revolutionize oncology research by unlocking the treasure trove of FFPE samples that have been previously unable to be characterized.

“Together, we are helping cancer researchers perform whole exome and targeted re-sequencing of pure cell types, and often just using a few hundred cells."