Log in or Register for enhanced features | Forgotten Password?
White Papers | Suppliers | Events | Report Store | Companies | Dining Club | Videos
Diagnostics
In Vitro Diagnostics
Return to: MDBR Home | Diagnostics | In Vitro Diagnostics

Roche introduces new chromogen for cancer research

MDBR Staff Writer Published 14 March 2016

Roche has expanded its Ventana modular-based detection kits with the introduction the new Discovery Yellow kit for cancer research.

Roche

The kit will support in the identification and profiling of cancer biomarkers and tumor cell populations.

Discovery Yellow is an alkaline phosphatase-based detection chemistry for tissue diagnostics, which produces a transparent yellow signal that cannot be washed during alcohol dehydration such as some precipitating dyes.

It fits into routine laboratory workflow. The kit will advance immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) multiplexing.

Roche tissue diagnostics head Ann Costello said: "By providing additional staining detection flexibility to the research community, we give our customers more options in their multiplexing applications, allowing for further advancement in their biomarker research."

The new kit is available in ready-to-use dispensers that can be fully automated on the Discovery Ultra system, providing researchers with enhanced productivity for increasingly complex assay requirements.

It can also be used in combination with other dyes to offer a color, which contrasts with other chromogens.

The firm's other modular chromogens comprise of Discovery Purple, Discovery Red and Discovery Silver, which will allow users to select multiple markers for multiplexing. These can be simultaneously studied with limited tissue samples.

Discovery Yellow can be used in conjunction with other chromogens to detect signal co-localization, in which the spatial overlapping of two signals can be studied by forming a third color.


Image: Discovery Yellow kit can be used in combination with other dyes to provide a distinct color that contrast with other chromogens. Photo: courtesy of PRNewsFoto/Roche.