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Siemens Healthineers buys German firm Conworx Technology

MDBR Staff Writer Published 08 November 2016

Siemens Healthineers, the separately managed healthcare business of Siemens, has acquired German firm Conworx Technology for an undisclosed sum.

Based in Berlin, Conworx provides laboratory point-of-care device interfaces and data management solutions for its customers.

The company produces point-of-care data management solutions, including POCcelerator, UniPOC and AegisPOC.

Conworx products are said to compliment Siemens’ RAPIDComm data management system, in addition to advancing informatics offerings for the point-of-care market.

They enable to deliver open connectivity for more than 100 different instruments from all major manufacturers.

Siemens Healthineers point of care diagnostics president Peter Koerte said: “As hospitals consolidate and acquire physician offices, there is a huge need by emerging healthcare networks for seamless integration of hundreds of decentralized devices that are spread across dozens of sites.

“It is clear to us that to satisfy our customers’ needs, we must deliver solutions that ensure superb connectivity, no matter which analyzer is being connected.”

Conworx’s team of 75 employees, including interface development, application development and data management specialists, will work under the of Conworx current CEO Roman Rosenkranz.

Rosenkranz said: “By joining with Siemens Healthineers, we will get access to a global organization to even better support our joint customer base.”

In May, Siemens Healthineers acquired another German firm Neo New Oncology to expand its diagnostics portfolio.

Neo New Oncology has developed cancer genome diagnostic platform, which will enable pathologists and oncologists to collect molecular information for select targeted cancer therapies.