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SystemOne, Daktari collaborate to improve value of diagnostics

MDBR Staff Writer Published 05 December 2016

SystemOne and Daktari Diagnostics have partnered to bring connected diagnostics to developing world.

Under the development and license agreement, the companies will incorporate Daktari's technology platform with SystemOne's connectivity platform Aspect. 

The partnership will enable to link clinically relevant test results and operational data from Daktari's point-of-care (POC) diagnostics to its device users through secure mobile networks and simple-to-use interfaces, including SMS, email, and an online dashboard.

SystemOne’s Aspect provides healthcare practitioners with real-time and complete disease surveillance and monitoring capabilities. It will help global health officials to assess the impact of their efforts on public health.

A prototype version of the Aspect connectivity system is expected to be available in the first quarter of next year.

The World Health Organization has prepared common standards to implement POC diagnostic connectivity platforms for local health care centers in lower and middle-income countries (LMICs).

Daktari president and CEO Donald Hawthorne said: Our collaboration with SystemOne, a trusted market leader with experience connecting diagnostics to data services and streamlined decision-support systems in more than 30 countries, will improve access to clinically relevant diagnostic data via a globally standardized connectivity solution for the clinicians, laboratories and public health organizations that make global patient care possible.”

SystemOne CEO Chris Macek said: "Daktari has been highly supportive as we develop and plan to scale-up Aspect, the next generation of our connectivity solution for managing TB, HIV, Hepatitis C and other diseases in lower- and middle-income countries.”